Cockroach Inspires Robot that Squeezes Through Cracks

“What’s impressive about these cockroaches is that they can run as fast through a quarter-inch gap as a half-inch gap, by reorienting their legs completely out to the side,” said study leader Kaushik Jayaram, who recently obtained his Ph.D. from UC Berkeley and is now a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University. “They’re about half an inch tall when they run freely, but can squish their bodies to one-tenth of an inch — the height of two stacked pennies.”

Enhancing the IB and MCB Undergraduate Experience at Cal

The IB and MCB Departments have partnered up to support undergrads and their love for the biosciences.

More than 200 students attended this exciting networking event held on Jan 21st from 2-5pm in the Li Ka Shing Lobbies. Even more incredible? That this event was made BY students (both IB and MCB) FOR students. A whopping 26 clubs and organizations dedicated their time and efforts to the student community.

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Let them see you sweat: What new wearable sensors can reveal from perspiration

While health monitors have exploded onto the consumer electronics scene over the past decade, researchers say this device, reported in the Jan. 28 issue of the journal Nature, is the first fully integrated electronic system that can provide continuous, non-invasive monitoring of multiple biochemicals in sweat.

UC Awards Catalyze Interdisciplinary Research on Berkeley campus

$1.76 million over three years for a Conservation Genomics Network, led by UCLA and involving UC Berkeley’s Rasmus Nielsen as co-principal investigator and Michael Nachman, Steven Beissinger and Erica Rosenblum as co-investigators. The goal is to develop a revolutionary bioinformatics toolkit to understand changes in gene expression and how threatened populations respond to changes in their habitats and in the climate.

The Surprising Benefits of Stress

Daniela Kaufer, PhD, is an associate professor at UC Berkeley who studies the biology of stress, examining at the molecular level how the brain responds to anxiety and traumatic events. Her most recent findings show that certain kinds of stress can have surprising benefits. Dr. Kaufer explains the difference between good stress and bad stress, and gives pointers for how to respond to stressful events in a healthy way.

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