Research

2016 I-House Annual Celebration & Awards Gala to Honor Dr. Marian Diamond and I-House Alumni Faculty of UC Berkeley

BERKELEY, CA – I-House alumni and friends will gather March 31st under the iconic dome of International House Berkeley for its 28th Annual Celebration and Awards Gala. The evening is the largest annual fundraising event for the non-profit which for 86 years has promoted intercultural respect and understanding in the local community and to its residential community of nearly 600 students from around the world and across the U.S. 

Bromances may be good for men’s health

“A bromance can be a good thing,” said lead author Elizabeth Kirby, who started work on the study while a doctoral student at UC Berkeley and continued it after assuming a postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford. “Males are getting a bad rap when you look at animal models of social interactions, because they are assumed to be instinctively aggressive. But even rats can have a good cuddle – essentially a male-male bromance – to help recover from a bad day.”

Worldwide bee epidemic linked to human cause: colony trafficking

To determine the course and source of the virus’s spread around the globe, a UC Berkeley researcher Michael Boots, professor of integrative biology, collaborated with colleagues at Exeter University in the UK to analyze the genomes of viruses collected from around Europe, Asia, Australia and North America.

“The key insight of our work is that the global virus pandemic in honeybees is manmade not natural,”

Cockroach Inspires Robot that Squeezes Through Cracks

“What’s impressive about these cockroaches is that they can run as fast through a quarter-inch gap as a half-inch gap, by reorienting their legs completely out to the side,” said study leader Kaushik Jayaram, who recently obtained his Ph.D. from UC Berkeley and is now a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University. “They’re about half an inch tall when they run freely, but can squish their bodies to one-tenth of an inch — the height of two stacked pennies.”

Let them see you sweat: What new wearable sensors can reveal from perspiration

While health monitors have exploded onto the consumer electronics scene over the past decade, researchers say this device, reported in the Jan. 28 issue of the journal Nature, is the first fully integrated electronic system that can provide continuous, non-invasive monitoring of multiple biochemicals in sweat.

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