Bromances may be good for men’s health

“A bromance can be a good thing,” said lead author Elizabeth Kirby, who started work on the study while a doctoral student at UC Berkeley and continued it after assuming a postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford. “Males are getting a bad rap when you look at animal models of social interactions, because they are assumed to be instinctively aggressive. But even rats can have a good cuddle – essentially a male-male bromance – to help recover from a bad day.”

What Shapes Your Identity? Skin Color? A Surname? Or What’s in Your Fridge?

Leslea J. Hlusko, Associate Professor of Integrative Biology was interviewed by CALIFORNIA Magazine about the question of: What is race? 

"Questions of race and ethnicity are hard to answer, and even risky to ask. We asked them anyway, and here’s what people on the UC Berkeley campus had to say."

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Genome Analysis Pinpoints Arrival and Spread of First Americans

The analysis, using the most comprehensive genetic data set from Native Americans to date, was conducted using three different statistical models, two of them created by UC Berkeley researchers. The first, developed by the lab of Yun Song, a UC Berkeley associate professor of statistics and of electrical engineering and computer sciences, takes into account the full DNA information available from the genomes in the study.

Cockroach Robot Squeezes Though Cracks (Ugh!)

Dubbed “veloci-roach,” the crawling device uses sensors and locomotion like many other bio-inspired devices.

But this one flips on its side to shimmy through spaces that would normally prove too small, according to Chen Li, postdoctoral researcher in the UC Berkeley department of integrative biology, and electrical engineering and computer science.