Some birds sing the same song for hundreds of thousands of years

A new study by biologists from the University of California, Berkeley, and Missouri State University in Springfield, however, documents songs in East African sunbirds that have remained nearly unchanged for more than 500,000 years, and perhaps for as long as 1 million years, making the songs nearly indistinguishable from those of relatives from which they’ve long been separated.

Learn more about graduate study at UC Berkeley

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The University of California, Berkeley is holding its second virtual Graduate Diversity Admissions Fair October 18-22 to help prospective professional, master's, and doctoral students learn more about UC Berkeley overall, our application process, and departments in your area of interest.

Graduate Diversity Admissions Fair
Dates: Monday, Oct. 18 through Friday, Oct. 22
IB Grad Program Info Session: Oct 19, 2-3pm PST

Captured in flight

University of California, Berkeley, doctoral candidate Lawrence Wang, leader of the squirrel documentation project and his team refined efforts to produce the high quality cover images of the August 2021 issue of Science magazine. Their efforts produced some of the best high quality motion shots of fox squirrels showing off their stuff as they leap through the air. 

Read more about the process here! 

Leaping squirrels! Parkour is one of their many feats of agility

Biologists like Robert Full at the University of California, Berkeley, have shown over the last few decades how animals like geckos, cockroaches and squirrels physically move and how their bodies and limbs help them in sticky situations — all of which have been applied to making more agile robots. But now they are tackling a harder problem: How do animals decide whether or not to take a leap? How do they assess their biomechanical abilities to know whether they can stick the landing?

New book on species concepts by professor Brent Mishler

A new book entitled “What, if Anything, are Species?” by IB Professor Brent Mishler explores this controversial topic in detail, based on 40 years of investigation. He concludes that species are nothing special; entities currently given that rank are simply clades like taxa at all other levels on the tree of life, smaller or larger than the traditional species level.  He goes into the advantages of fully rankless classification, and of a multi-level approach to ecology and evolution.